“Reading of the will” in Nevada Probate

“Reading of the Will” Not Required by Nevada Probate Law

Nevada probate law has no provision that requires a “reading of the will.” The Nevada probate process ensures that anyone can know the contents of the will because the will must be lodged with the clerk of the court at which time it becomes a public record.

Sometimes I am asked by family members when we will have the “reading of the will.” Hollywood has lead many to believe that the “reading of the will” is a part of the probate process. We’ve all seen TV shows and movies where a stuffy lawyer sits at a desk reading a will in erudite tones while family members wait with bated breath to find out what, if anything, they have inherited. This scene exists in the movies, but not in the Nevada probate code.

Origins of “Reading of the Will”

There are a few different theories about where the idea of the “reading of the will” comes from.  Some think the concept is nothing more than a creation of Hollywood.  Others speculate that in centuries past, when the vast majority of people were illiterate, wills were formally read as the only means to inform heirs of their inheritance.

In Nevada, All Wills Are Public Record

Those who wish to see the contents of a will in Nevada may obtain a copy from the Clerk of the Court.  In Nevada, wills are public record and anyone can obtain a copy, even if they are not an heir and even if they were explicitly disinherited.

In Nevada probate, all wills are public record. Thus, a "reading of the will" is not required or necessary. Anyone can inspect them, whether or not their are an heir or a beneficiary.

In Nevada probate, all wills are public record. Thus, a “reading of the will” is not required or necessary. Anyone can inspect them, whether or not their are an heir or a beneficiary.

 

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